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Publications: 2020

Posters2020

Assessment of potentially vulnerable use areas in western Africa

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ACS 2020, AGRO 46
Session Title: Analysis of Agriculturally-Important Chemicals

Abstract:

The Acetochlor Registration Partnership (ARP; Dow AgroSciences and Monsanto Company) developed voluntary acetochlor Best Management Practices (BMPs) to reduce the potential for the active substance to reach ground water and surface water. As part of an ongoing global acetochlor stewardship support, a study has been conducted to determine the co-occurrence between acetochlor use on crops and potentially vulnerable soils in the Permanent Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (French: Comité permanent inter-État de lutte contre la sécheresse au Sahel, aka CILSS) countries. The assessment was focused on high potential use areas of acetochlor, within the CILSS, for two representative crops (corn and cotton). The geospatial analysis performed identified approximately 462 million hectares (ha) of potentially vulnerable soils in the CILSS of which 65.7 million ha of soils are within agricultural areas. Acetochlor product labels approved in the US by the US Environmental Protection Agency, restrict applications on vulnerable soils within 50 feet of any well where depth to ground water is ≤ 9 m. Other agricultural BMPs for applying acetochlor products in the US are designed to minimize run-off to surface water. Approximately 0.24% of agricultural fields (0.159 million ha of soils) in the CILSS are in areas of shallow groundwater. In addition, 0.02 % (0.0128 million ha) were determined to be adjacent to surface water bodies. The analysis provides evidence that only small portions of vulnerable agricultural soils in the CILSS may be at risk for acetochlor contamination by means of leaching to groundwater or surface runoff. The approach could be expanded to other regions to inform water quality management decisions for products containing acetochlor.

C. Hoogeweg (Waterborne), M.A. Thomas (O3A, Monsanto Company), N. Pai (O3A, Monsanto Company), J. Schleier (Dow AgroSciences). Assessment of poentially vulnerable use areas in western Africa. AGRO 46, ACS 2020. Virtual Meeting.

PresentationsAgriculture and Food, Crop Protection2020

Impact of climate change on the relevance of TFD studies and OECD crosswalks

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ACS 2020, AGRO 235
Session Title: Sustainability in Agriculture: Understanding the Environmental Footprint of Developing Crop Protection Products
Monday, August 17, 2020 8:00AM

Abstract:

Climate change studies confirm that the earth is warming up and that shifts in rainfall patterns is occurring. Various computer models predict that Earth’s average temperature will rise between 1.8° and 4.0° Celsius (3.2° and 7.2° F). Consequently, these warmer temperatures will cause a higher rate of evaporation, resulting in a predicted increase of average global rainfall by 3-5%. This climate change, therefore, will impact the relevance of historical and current terrestrial field dissipation (TFD) studies. Under OCED guidance, TFD studies conducted in one country can be applicable to other countries if the characteristics of overlapping ecoregions are the same. These assessments are conducted using the OECD ENASGIPS tool. If these characteristics change, so will the similarity assessment and therefore the potential relevance of TFD sites. With increase rainfall, TFD sites in the Southeastern US, which typically have few similar areas, may become more relevant because other areas are receiving more rainfall. Likewise, TFD sites in Canada, characterized by cold winters, may become more applicable to larger areas in Europe with increasing temperature. In this presentation we will review some of the climate change scenarios, place existing TFD sites in context of new climates and determine the impact on OECD crosswalks.

C. Hoogeweg, A. Ritter (Waterborne). Impact of climate change on the relevance of TFD studies and OECD crosswalks. AGRO 235, ACS 2020. Virtual Meeting

PresentationsAgriculture and Food, Crop Protection2020

Novel approaches for assessing management of tile-drain agricultural chemical transport

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ACS 2020, AGRO 214
Session Title: Off-target Transport of Field Applied Agricultural Chemicals
Monday, August 17, 2020 8:00AM

Abstract:

The study of conservation best management practices and their effectiveness at mitigating the off-site transport of agricultural chemicals is an established research field. While runoff and erosion have received much study focus, there is a growing need for new and novel approaches to monitor nutrients in tile-drained systems. A sophisticated water monitoring system was developed that utilizes technology to create an automated pass-through sampling site, employing state of the art nutrient sensor technology to monitor nitrate concentrations in thirty-seven discrete subsurface agricultural drainage tile laterals at a sampling rate of between two and four hours per sample at each tile. This design has proven highly efficient and provides a data resolution that would be impractical to consider under conventional sampling methods. It also allows for the replicated study of several treatments (different mitigation practice approaches) and control plots, with little additional cost per added plot. Additional benefits include the ability to view data in real-time, allowing researchers to observe real-time rainfall event-based plot responses without the analytical results delay from a laboratory. The developed site data provides the needed resolution for tile drain model validation or developments.

G. Goodwin (Waterborne), L. Gentry (Illinois Corn Growers Association), P. Paulausky, J. Trask, A. Jacobson, A. Ritter (Waterborne). Novel approaches for assessing management of tile-drain agricultural chemical transport. AGRO 214, ACS 2020. Virtual Meeting.

PresentationsCrop Protection2020

Consideration of non-Apis bee species in pollinator risk assessment

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ACS 2020, AGRO 164
Session Title: Extending the Boundaries of Pollinator Research and Risk Assessment Methodologies for Pesticides
Monday, August 17, 2020 8:00AM

Abstract:

The pollinator risk assessment process for pesticides from regulatory agencies, including USEPA, PMRA, and CDPR, have historically relied on the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera) as a surrogate species to represent all Apis and non-Apis bees. However, the life-history characteristics of non-Apis bee species, including solitary, stingless, and bumble bees, indicate differences from the surrogate honeybee species. These differences introduce uncertainty in the exposure and effects assumptions for the use of honeybees as a surrogate species, leading to the recent efforts of examining risk of pesticides to non-Apis species. The objective of this presentation is to provide a current state-of-the-science update on the specific life-history characteristics and specific risk assessment considerations for non-Apis species. Exposure assumptions will be examined and comparative toxicological sensitivities will be presented with recommendations for appropriate use in the pollinator risk assessment framework. Challenges in the development of non-Apis laboratory testing methods will also be presented.

J. Collins, J. Jackson, A. Ritter, A. Schmolke (Waterborne). Consideration of non-Apis bee species in pollinator risk assessment. AGRO 164, ACS 2020. Virtual Meeting.